How Does Blackjack in Latin America Work?

Spanish 21By Alex Hotch

Blackjack is undoubtedly a popular casino game in the world. The online variants are becoming more popular due to the ease of accessing the game. Players can play blackjack from the comfort of their homes and win money while at it. There are many versions of blackjack and the popular version of the game in Latin America is referred to as Spanish blackjack. 

It is also popularly known as Spanish 21 and you can find the game across different casino sites, including sites such as Casinos Apuestas at https://casinos-apuestas.com/en/. Although many people think that blackjack and Spanish 21 are not the same, the fact is that they are. Understandably, some reasons may make people think that they are not entirely the same but they are.

What are the Rules of Spanish Blackjack?

The Spanish blackjack, also known as Spanish 21, is played on the blackjack table and it has a customized layout with specific rules. Here are some of the rules of the game:

  • Spanish blackjack is played with 6 or 8 decks that are dealt from a shoe. They can also be dealt from a CSM (Continuous Shuffling Machine). The game is played with 48-card Spanish decks. However, the regular French-suited 52-card decks can also be used with the four 10-spot cards eliminated. Every card in a game of blackjack has the same value.
  • The game starts with the dealer dealing 2 cards to each player and himself. The wagers are then placed and the players can choose to double down, stand, split, or it, depending on the players’ hands and the dealer’s.
  • The dealer receives a hole card and like in the traditional blackjack game, the dealer hits on the 16 and stands on 17. The dealer may hit on a Soft 17 (H17) in some locations but most locations have their dealers stand on Soft 17 (S17). When the soft 17 is hit, it negatively affects the player because the house edge is increased by 0.40%
  • Whether the dealer has a blackjack or not, the blackjack will win and it is paid at 3 to 2. Insurance is paid at 2 to 1 even though there are fewer 10-valued cards per deck. Three cards in twelve are worth 10 and the chances of a dealer getting the blackjack when it shows an Ace is just 25%. This means that for insurance to be regarded as an even bet, it must pay at 3 to 1 and not 2 to 1. Usually, the house edge on insurance is about 24.7%, which is one of the worst of bets in a casino. 
  • Players may split a maximum of 4 hands including on Aces

These are some of the rules of the Spanish Blackjack. Most of the rules are the same as other game variants, but it has its unique difference.

Conclusion

If you live in any of the Latin American countries and you are conversant with casino games, you would be familiar with Spanish Blackjack. If you have not attempted the game, you should give it a try, as it has many exciting turns that will keep you at the edge of your seat. Of course, you can play the game from the comfort of your home without visiting any physical casino too.  For more information on Spanish Blackjack / Spanish 21, check out the entry in the Encyclopedia of Blackjack.

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